Where is Coffee Grown in the US?

Where is Coffee Grown in the US?

At least once a week we get this question. Many people think that coffee is grown in the United States and we ship if from Alabama or Mississippi to our Furnace Hills Coffee roastery in Westminster, MD to roast and then make available to you. Well coffee is grown in the United States, but just in one place. That place is Hawaii. You see, coffee is grown between the 25′s. More directly between 25 degrees south and 25 degrees north. Outside of that band around the world, good coffee cannot be grown. As you can tell from the map below Miami, FL is outside of this coffee growing belt that encircles our planet. 

So do you have a special liking to the coffees from these countries? Do you know about the coffees that come from these countries to make an informed choice? Some of you do others don’t. Our list of single origin coffees are as follows:

  • Bolivian Superior
  • Honduran
  • Aquas de Marco — Brazil
  • Espirito Santo — Costa Rica
  • Ethiopian
  • Sumatran
  • Monsoon Myst — India
  • Colombian

We are considering a virtual tour of the world. We are thinking of offering a coffee travel club that features twelve single origin coffees a year. We would give those who subscribe information on the country and farm the coffee comes from.

What countries would you like to drink coffee from?

What should we title this coffee travel club?

Furnace Hills Coffee Shop:

When we reach 400 pounds of roasting/selling each week we’re going to move our coffee roasters to the back and build out a coffee bar in front. We are less than 100/week away from that milestone. Here’s what we think our shop will look like:

Furnace Hills Coffee Shop

Furnace Hills Coffee Shop

So what do you think? Is it a place you would visit? Besides our famous Furnace Hills Coffees, what else should we offer? Should we be a Third Wave shop and forego all the expensive brewing equipment and do pour overs? What should our hours be? Should we be open on Sunday?

Although the coffee shop in the picture is in London I think we’ll be able to copy most of what they have done inside as well.

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Creating Green Coffee Extract At Home:

There has been much written and studied about green coffee extract and it’s many health benefits including weight loss with no dieting. It seems to speed up your metabolism. Kate Redwine in her book, Pure Green Coffee Bean Extract, gives us a recipe for making it ourselves. Below you’ll find the recipe.

Step One: Sourcing Out Quality Coffee Beans.

You need to source good green coffee beans. Now you can go to our website and find good beans (www.furnacehillscoffee.com). We’ll send you some Brazilian beans which Kate says are some of the best.

Green coffee beans, "washed"

Green coffee beans, “washed” (Photo credit: ahemler)

Step Two: Preparation of how to make coffee extract.

Put 2 oz. of coffee beans in a teapot with 12 oz. of distilled water. Put it into boil and then turn down the heat. Let the brewed beans simmer for about 10 to 15 minutes (be careful not to overcook it to maintain the integrity of the taste of the beans.). Take it from direct heat and let it cool for an hour.

Step Three: Enjoying Your Green Coffee Extract.

Put it in the refrigerator. It is good to drink for the next two days. To maximize the benefits Redwine writes that you should drink it twice a day.

So what do you think? Is it worth a try? I think I’m going to try it this week.

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Why Coffee is sometimes called “Joe”.

I ran across this article about the origin of the phrase, “cup of joe.”

Say hello to Josephus Daniels, former secretary of the US Navy and namesake of the proverbial cup of joe.

Joe is, of course, short for Joseph. And in American English, “joe” can refer to an average guy, a soldier, or—somewhat strangely—coffee. A popular chain in New York, for instance, is called Joe the Art of Coffee.

Josephus Daniels, the principal shaper of The ...

As it turns out, the use of joe as slang for coffee dates to the World War I era. It was then that Daniels, who started his career as a newspaper publisher in North Carolina, became secretary of the Navy under president Woodrow Wilson. As recounted in a new biography, Daniels tried to imbue the navy with a strict morality. He increased the number of chaplains, discouraged prostitution at naval bases, and, most controversially, banned the consumption of alcohol.

“As a substitute, stewards increased their purchases of coffee, among other beverages,” writes Lee Craig in the new book, “and Daniels’s name became linked to the daily drink of millions around the world. A cup of coffee became disparagingly known as ‘a cup of Joseph Daniels,’ and as legend has it, this was soon shortened to a ‘cup of Joe.’”

Article Link: http://qz.com/88453/why-coffee-is-called-joe/

If you could change the name of coffee what would you call it?

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